Comments on: Capturing Humanity: 10 Tips for Great Street and Market Photos http://uncorneredmarket.com/10-tips-for-great-street-and-market-photos/ travel wide, live deep Tue, 22 Apr 2014 14:31:12 +0000 hourly 1 http://wordpress.org/?v=3.8.3 By: Audrey Scotthttp://uncorneredmarket.com/10-tips-for-great-street-and-market-photos/#comment-1180307 Sat, 28 Dec 2013 10:10:25 +0000 http://www.uncorneredmarket.com/?p=1609#comment-1180307 @Leyla: Yes, great piece of advice and story. Having a woman come after me with a machete would certainly shake me up!!

It reminds me of when we were in Bolivia and visiting the indigenous market in Tarabuco. The people in the town do not like photographs taken of them and there are stories of tourists getting tomatoes thrown at them and such. One guy we met had taken a wide angle photo of the street, not realizing that there was a man at the far end of the street. That guy came after him, started yelling at him and looked like he was going to beat him up. Fortunately, a shopkeeper came out to help the tourist and brought him back into the shop. So yes, always be sure there isn’t someone in the background :)

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By: Leyla Girayhttp://uncorneredmarket.com/10-tips-for-great-street-and-market-photos/#comment-1179110 Fri, 27 Dec 2013 23:23:27 +0000 http://www.uncorneredmarket.com/?p=1609#comment-1179110 Thanks Audrey – I agree with everything you say and really appreciate all the great tips and advice (much needed by me!). It’s important to go where people are, and to make that connection.

I would add one thing: beware what’s in the background. In Lagos (Nigeria) I was chatting with a vegetable-seller in a market, we were both smiling, relaxed, and I asked if I could take her picture. She immediately agreed and as I put up my camera, a huge yell came from behind her, followed by a woman wielding a machete!

“No picture!” she screamed, clambering over stalls in her effort to slice off a piece of me. I was of course terrified and managed to take refuge in a nearby building. I eventually understood that she had been in the background and saw me taking a photograph. She couldn’t tell whether I was shooting her or anyone else, and was afraid I was stealing her spirit – so she wanted it back, or something along those lines. I truly hadn’t noticed she was there, but felt a bit better when I was told she was prone to outbreaks of violence – it wasn’t just me.

Moral of that story… look at the entire frame…

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By: Daniel Nollhttp://uncorneredmarket.com/10-tips-for-great-street-and-market-photos/#comment-874519 Wed, 11 Sep 2013 14:44:24 +0000 http://www.uncorneredmarket.com/?p=1609#comment-874519 @Mariane: Excellent. We totally understand. From the standpoint of respect, your approach is better than the other extreme.

Having said that, it’s surprising how approachable people are, especially after you’ve made some sort of connection with them on a human level.

Enjoy!

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By: Mariane [TheChroniclesofMariane]http://uncorneredmarket.com/10-tips-for-great-street-and-market-photos/#comment-871921 Mon, 09 Sep 2013 14:19:58 +0000 http://www.uncorneredmarket.com/?p=1609#comment-871921 I used to be shy on snapping portraits on the assumption that some people might be offended if I do, and then I always regret not having to do it after the trip. These are great tips and will be noting of these on my next travels.

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By: Audrey Scotthttp://uncorneredmarket.com/10-tips-for-great-street-and-market-photos/#comment-826391 Sat, 27 Jul 2013 12:05:04 +0000 http://www.uncorneredmarket.com/?p=1609#comment-826391 @Elena: So glad you found this article useful. It does take time to work up the courage and get into a groove approaching people and photographing them. I also find that explaining to people why you are taking the photo sometimes helps – often people are proud that you want to use them as an example/ambassador for their country or town. Good luck and happy photographing!

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By: Elenahttp://uncorneredmarket.com/10-tips-for-great-street-and-market-photos/#comment-821820 Mon, 22 Jul 2013 08:36:38 +0000 http://www.uncorneredmarket.com/?p=1609#comment-821820 I really enjoyed reading this article. I’ve just began traveling myself haven’t yet built the courage to approach people and really be at ease with the locals. I always feel as I’m intruding and I don’t want them to feel that they are being gawked at. These are wonderful tips to establish a real connection and I will make sure to use them next time I’m out shooting about!

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By: Daniel Nollhttp://uncorneredmarket.com/10-tips-for-great-street-and-market-photos/#comment-536589 Sun, 16 Dec 2012 10:25:40 +0000 http://www.uncorneredmarket.com/?p=1609#comment-536589 @John: Glad you enjoyed it.

@Esme: All things being equal, shooting in RAW certainly helps with the end image quality Having said that, shooting in RAW doesn’t affect the relationship photographers have with their subjects.

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By: Esmehttp://uncorneredmarket.com/10-tips-for-great-street-and-market-photos/#comment-529908 Tue, 11 Dec 2012 02:37:48 +0000 http://www.uncorneredmarket.com/?p=1609#comment-529908 Shoot in RAW.

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By: John DW Macdonaldhttp://uncorneredmarket.com/10-tips-for-great-street-and-market-photos/#comment-529851 Tue, 11 Dec 2012 01:29:05 +0000 http://www.uncorneredmarket.com/?p=1609#comment-529851 Again your practical wisdom, respectful approachand informative sharing are exemplary.Many, many thanks. I shall lin this in from my blog, posting a cover phot for attraction.

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By: Daniel Nollhttp://uncorneredmarket.com/10-tips-for-great-street-and-market-photos/#comment-456773 Mon, 06 Aug 2012 07:22:31 +0000 http://www.uncorneredmarket.com/?p=1609#comment-456773 @Lorenzo: Not asking people to pose is a necessity, agreed.

@Matt: The goal is a smile, not even necessarily for the camera, but for the interaction itself.

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