Panorama of the Week: New Mosque (Yeni Camii), Istanbul

Istanbul’s Yeni Camii (New Mosque).  Somehow we’d missed this one during our last visit to Istanbul eleven years ago.

Today, while wandering around and outside the streets of Istanbul’s spice market looking for a head scarf (for Audrey, not Dan), we stumbled across and into Yeni Camii (New Mosque).  While the outside is rather stark gray, the inner courtyard warmed with a bit of late afternoon light.

But it was the inside of the mosque that blew us away.  Carpeted, warm, and almost surprisingly inviting, the interior of Yeni Camii wraps a visitor in mesmerizing colors, designs and Arabic script. Just about anywhere you happen to place the camera frame, a fascinating set of shapes and geometry is revealed.

And it’s here that we’ll leave you.  Open the panorama below.  And be sure to use the up arrow to make your way to the ceiling.  Imagine sitting on the carpet and gazing at the vastness of it all.

That’s what we did.

360-Degree Panorama: Inside Istanbul’s New Mosque (Yeni Camii)

panorama directions

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Comments

  1. says

    Beautiful. I’ve been to a lot of churches and different temples, but I’ve never been to a mosque. I think I’m saving it for Istanbul. I really love your panoramas by the way.

  2. says

    @Dean: Istanbul (and Turkey in general) is certainly worth a visit. But it’s a big city. It’s possible to spend over a week here easily. We just happen to have a few days, so we’re visiting some of the areas that we are unfamiliar with and staying in a part of the city (Taksim) that we haven’t stayed in before.

    And you’ll find your share of mosques, for sure.

    Glad to hear that you are enjoying the panoramas. Colorful and culturally relevant interiors like this one are pretty satisfying to shoot.

  3. says

    Istanbul has tons of beautiful mosques. Check out Rustem Pasha and Sulemaniye as well. My wife and I had a chance to pray in almost all of them.

    Shawn

  4. Sutapa Chattopadhyay says

    Btw, in Turkey you are allowed inside mosques (just a curiosity question)? Since you guys are non-muslims. In some places non-muslims are not allowed in.

  5. says

    Seems like everyone is in Turkey at the moment. Hope you enjoy Istanbul – especially all the great street food. Have you managed to have hamsi at the Karaköy fish market? Don’t miss it if not.

    Love your panorama of Yeni Camii.

  6. says

    @Sutapa: The New Mosque was built in the 16th century, which of course makes it not so new. Your second question is especially interesting…visitors are allowed in, non-Muslims, too. It’s all very open and friendly — just a request to take off one’s shoes and for women to cover their heads. For visitors who happen to be unfamiliar with Islam, Istanbul’s New Mosque offers a beautiful visual introduction.

    In the New Mosque, there’s a front or foyer area where visitors are allowed, beyond which there’s a prayer area in which only Muslims are allowed.

    @Julia: Glad you like the panorama. Was a very nice experience.

    We had our share of street food, but haven’t had hamsi in Karaköy fish market. Next time. Not enough time in Istanbul of course as we recovered from our trip to Crete and prepared for our trip to Iran, which we are on currently.

    @Azeem: Glad you like it. Istanbul’s New Mosque is certainly worth a visit. Its construction began in 1597, finished in 1663.

  7. Samuel says

    I have been in Istanbul once and I am so impressed by the architecture, especially the Blue Mosque and the St Sofia. Great places to visit!

  8. says

    @Samuel: Istanbul definitely has its share of wonderful and wonderfully colorful architecture, especially when it comes to interiors. That’s the thing about the New Mosque, it doesn’t get quite the coverage that the Blue Mosque and Hagia Sofia (or Aya Sofya, if you like) do, but it’s impressive and visit-worthy nonetheless.

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