Panorama of the Week: The Louvre Pyramid

The Louvre Pyramid. Love it or hate it?

I used to lean more to the latter, thinking the glass and steel structure clashed with the French Renaissance palace architecture surrounding it. It felt disruptive, as if it “shouldn’t” be there.

However, this past weekend after walking through a dust storm in the Jardin des Tuileries, under the Arc de Triomphe du Carrousel (which from afar coincidentally looks remarkably like Berlin’s Brandenburg Gate), and past the sea of vendors selling €1 Eiffel Tower trinkets, I was thrust into the grand courtyard of the Louvre Palace and found myself looking at I.M. Pei’s pyramid with fresh eyes.

And you know, I’m a convert. The clean lines, clear glass, and shining steel offered a refreshing contrast to the dense, sculpted, impenetrable stone of the palace walls. Maybe all this is a reflection of my getting older (it was my birthday weekend after all). Maybe I welcome disruption ever more into my own life these days. Or, perhaps, it’s just that my tastes have changed.

Regardless, even in the world of architecture, who is to say what should and shouldn’t be?

My question to you: Louvre Pyramid? Love it or hate it?

Panorama: Louvre Courtyard and Pyramid, Paris

panorama directions

Disclosure: Our accommodation in Paris was provided by Shangri-La Hotels in conjunction with its #LovingtheMoment Instagram campaign.

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Comments

  1. says

    I love it. I think it’s both unique and iconic, and somehow works amidst the other architecture of the museum. I like the contrast. :)

  2. says

    @ciki: yeah, there is something light and refreshing about the glass and metal against all the stone.

    @Gina: Couldn’t agree more! The pyramid shape is iconic, but it works in the space.

  3. says

    @Sutapa: Glad you enjoyed it! We didn’t wait in line to get into the Museum this time around. It houses such an amazing collection of art.

    @David: Like your interpretation!

  4. says

    @Michael: I had completely forgotten about the Da Vinci Code angle when we visited. It’s a fun place to be, especially as you can think about all the incredible paintings waiting behind those thick walls.

    @John: It is pretty nice :)

  5. says

    Excellent panorama and you really got lucky with the weather. Never been there. We planned on it, but sometimes plans fall through. Next time… right?

  6. says

    @Stephen: And it’s not just paintings, but sculptures and so many antiquities. It could take a week to explore it all – maybe more.

    @Mike: Fortunately, I don’s see this going away anytime soon. So next time be sure to visit.

    @Gabriel: Not dumb at all. Any reason to explore is a good one.

Trackbacks

  1. [...] Here’s another solution for panoramas. It’s actually a 360 degree pan viewer, one of those virtual world things that are about as old as interactivity on the world wide web. But the person (Audrey Scott) using it is a travel photographer and her goal is to present a beautiful photograph of the pyramid at the Louvre. The solution has it’s problems, but I’m taking it into account as I think about my lightbox project. [...]

  2. [...] Here’s another solution for panoramas. It’s actually a 360 degree pan viewer, one of those virtual world things that are about as old as interactivity on the world wide web. But the person (Audrey Scott) using it is a travel photographer and her goal is to present a beautiful photograph of the pyramid at the Louvre. The solution has it’s problems, but I’m taking it into account as I think about my lightbox project. [...]

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