Comments on: Potosi, Through Children’s Eyes (Where Were You When You Were Twelve?) http://uncorneredmarket.com/potosi-mines-children/ travel wide, live deep Fri, 29 Aug 2014 03:57:32 +0000 hourly 1 http://wordpress.org/?v=3.9.2 By: Arianwenhttp://uncorneredmarket.com/potosi-mines-children/#comment-414750 Mon, 14 May 2012 19:09:51 +0000 http://www.uncorneredmarket.com/?p=3044#comment-414750 This is a very informative post. Thank you for sharing. I’m considering visiting Potosi when I’m in Bolivia in October. I’m not sure whether to go into the mines though. Aside from feeling claustrophobic, as you say, I don’t want to pay to watch people suffer. But, at the same time, I feel like it’s important, when you travel to a new country, to gain insight into the lives of the people who live there – and not just the ones you meet every day in a tourist capacity. I hope that the boys in that mine benefit, if only a little, from the money, gifts, and perhaps even the interaction with visitors.

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By: Adrianahttp://uncorneredmarket.com/potosi-mines-children/#comment-331972 Fri, 16 Dec 2011 21:44:58 +0000 http://www.uncorneredmarket.com/?p=3044#comment-331972 that good article. I really like the comparison of children in mines of the people. There are big differences and thoughts, as well as the quality of life and suffering to achieve a dream that the end is survival. In my 12 years studying and I think it was the only one in my mind, well played and was happy

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By: Daniel Nollhttp://uncorneredmarket.com/potosi-mines-children/#comment-26828 Thu, 22 Jul 2010 10:38:11 +0000 http://www.uncorneredmarket.com/?p=3044#comment-26828 @JD: Sad in one way, but uplifting in another. I suppose that’s why we chose to contrast the kids in the mines (who are in their own way uplifting) with the girls teaching us how to wash our hands.

You are right though — bottom line: appreciate what you have.

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By: JD @ Sell Buseshttp://uncorneredmarket.com/potosi-mines-children/#comment-26538 Tue, 20 Jul 2010 00:04:16 +0000 http://www.uncorneredmarket.com/?p=3044#comment-26538 This is sad but makes you appreciate what you have.

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By: Weekend Reading – Best Travel Posts From Around The Web | As We Travelhttp://uncorneredmarket.com/potosi-mines-children/#comment-8976 Sat, 20 Feb 2010 12:06:15 +0000 http://www.uncorneredmarket.com/?p=3044#comment-8976 [...] Potosi Through Children’s Eyes – Audrey and Daniel from (Uncornered Market) explore the mines and it’s shocking history in Potosi, Bolivia – with 12 year old kids forced to work down the mines and how you can prepare if you plan on visiting there. [...]

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By: Audrey Scotthttp://uncorneredmarket.com/potosi-mines-children/#comment-7022 Mon, 25 Jan 2010 19:25:18 +0000 http://www.uncorneredmarket.com/?p=3044#comment-7022 @Dave and Deb: We do know some people who did not go on the mine tour out of the principle, but our experience shows that the best way to understand the real life situation or plight of people is to see it and experience it yourself. The same goes for a place like Burma.

We do hope that writing about issues like this will put a personal face on these issues and countries around the world that usually get forgotten. If more people care and have a personal connection, maybe something can be done. We can hope.

@Nomadic Chick: Thank you for including this article in your weekly round-up and for your kind comment. One of the main reasons we travel is to learn about the world firsthand and find out what life is like for regular people. We hope to share a bit of what we experience and learn through this website.

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By: Nomadic Chickhttp://uncorneredmarket.com/potosi-mines-children/#comment-6935 Sat, 23 Jan 2010 21:53:51 +0000 http://www.uncorneredmarket.com/?p=3044#comment-6935 I feel naive in commenting on child labor or mining conditions. I just wanted to thank you for such a comprehensive article. Your site always sheds light on not just the fun side of travel, but the social and political conditions.

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By: Weekend Reading – Best Travel Posts From Around The Web | Nathan Sofia Travel Bloghttp://uncorneredmarket.com/potosi-mines-children/#comment-6926 Sat, 23 Jan 2010 16:51:52 +0000 http://www.uncorneredmarket.com/?p=3044#comment-6926 [...] Potosi Through Children’s Eyes – Audrey and Daniel from (Uncornered Market) explore the mines and it’s shocking history in Potosi, Bolivia – with 12 year old kids forced to work down the mines and how you can prepare if you plan on visiting there. [...]

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By: Dave and Debhttp://uncorneredmarket.com/potosi-mines-children/#comment-6901 Sat, 23 Jan 2010 04:03:39 +0000 http://www.uncorneredmarket.com/?p=3044#comment-6901 Excellent article. I agree with you that going to these sites and raising awareness is very important to help change people circumstances. When the world is informed, great things can happen. If you visit places like this and write about it, you are doing a very good thing.
I applaud all of your work that you do to let us know about the plight of people in developing nations.
It is amazing the resilience that people have when faced with a difficult life. I feel that I could never survive, but then again, when you don’t have a choice the human mind and body is amazing.
I saw a young boy carrying cement in Agra India the other day. He was covered in dust and the load on his head looked so heavy. My heart broke. I wish that all children could have the chance to be children like the ones that you met at the hygiene fair.
I like to think that things are slowly changing.
With people like you out there raising awareness, maybe things will change just a little bit faster.
Thanks for always posting such inspirational pieces.

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By: Audrey Scotthttp://uncorneredmarket.com/potosi-mines-children/#comment-6868 Fri, 22 Jan 2010 15:15:57 +0000 http://www.uncorneredmarket.com/?p=3044#comment-6868 @unbjames: The reality in many parts of the world is that occupational safety isn’t even part of the vocabulary, unfortunately. It’s considered a luxury. The trick is finding a balance so that workers are protected, but the local company doesn’t go bankrupt in the process. Thanks for your thoughts and perspective.

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